Monday, January 28, 2013

How To Keep Your Child's Teeth Healthy

Here is an article based on an interview with Dr. Joel Berg, pediatric dentist and president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, discussing prevention of dental disease in children.  Basically, he lists five things: start dental visits early, eat healthy, care for baby teeth, model good habits, and make it fun.




22 comments:

childrens teeth said...

When a child learns good dental care habits at a young age, the child tends to maintain those habits into adulthood. Therefore, teaching your child proper oral health habits now can mean a lifetime of healthy teeth.

childrens teeth

Joseph Tagliarini said...

If your child is extra nervous about going to the dentist bring them along to one of your appointments. I've seen this work wonders with my own patients because the kids get to see what's going on, not guess from the chair. Plus they can ask questions and meet the hygienist and dentist beforehand.

Megan Hart said...

This article is so great! I am a first time mom, and my three year old daughter is coming to that age of understanding where I want to teach her how to take care of her body ( shower, clean socks, ect ) - including her teeth! I've been filtering through a lot of information and having a children dentistry give suggestions on how to help your child care for her teeth is so great. When should I start bringing my daughter into a dental office for regular check ups? Is three years old too early?

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends a child's first visit to the dentist be by one year of age (or 6 months after the eruption of the first tooth) which is usually 1 year of age.

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Ok, here is Anonymous' comment. It got lost in the Blogger system, so I am reposting it here:


Dr. Brandon,
Wondering if you can give me some advice.

My sons top 2 teeth--central & lateral incisors-- are of concern. They are so close that they are almost pushing each other out, kind of look like they're bulging at the seam, sort of creating a hollow tent underneath the 2 teeth. The central is damaged/broken on the bottom corner (that's how it came in. To me it looks like it just didn't have room b/c of the lateral tooth. Now they are turning slightly gray near the seam.

He has 10 teeth on top. I'm pretty sure it's 2 roots, 2 teeth, but they are just so close that they are damaging each other. We will be visiting out dentist when he turns 3 next month. Do you see any reason to be concerned or reason for us to get in to the office sooner?

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

It's hard to say, but darkness between baby teeth could indicate decay. Not always though. Sometimes kid's teeth are crowded or rotated. Sometimes there is actually an extra baby tooth there or something called partial gemination or the like that could make one tooth look kind of strange or have a seam down the middle. So, as always, I recommend seeing a Pediatric dentist. Three months is ok, but sooner is always better.

Dentist in Hyderabad said...

Good dental hygiene habit should be teached at childhood only... This will help them for lifetime... Nice post ...

Justin G. said...

Hmm, great info; '25 percent of children aged 2 to 5 years old in the United States have tooth decay', those are scary numbers!

I'll be paying extra attention to my kids' brushing from now on, definitely two times a day, if not three times..!

Dental care in Cincinnate said...

Amazing and great tips about careing of our children dental health you have shared.Thanks for sharing this.

Vero Beach Dentist said...

This is a good way and also I shall say this is a fascinating blog to tell others about dental care of their children.

Oscar Levy said...

Are we that inclined to have our baby checked up after 6 months or just on the first sight of growing a tooth?

Anonymous said...

When it comes to your children’s teeth, look for a highly trained professional to provide the best care. Visit for tips and suggestions.

Smile Reef said...

It is advisable to introduce pediatric dentistry to your children as early as age one so the dentist will be able to provide the necessary care for their teeth.

Roselle Park Dental: Jamie Oshidar, DMD said...

I just blogged about this very topic myself. We are really trying to educate parents and pediatricians that we need to see children by the age of one to educate parents, evaluate the teeth that are under the gums, establish a good daily hygiene routine and help the child feel comfortable at the dentist. Please visit my Website at http://www.roselleparkdental.com/.

dentist fresno said...

Dental blogging is a good way to make dental practices and services to be more visible and accessible to many target patients.

Beam Team said...

What a great article! I might just have to share it with my Twitter followers. Your child's oral hygiene is very important to his or her overall health and it is never too early start.
If you're having trouble getting your children to develop the proper dental hygiene habits I understand. Brushing twice a day for 2 minutes is even hard for some of us adults.
If you want a fun way to engage your children in their oral hygiene, the Beam Brush is an awesome product. The Beam Brush is a data collecting manual toothbrush with an Android/iPhone app to help engage, inform, and reward great oral health.
Find out more at http://beamtoothbrush.com/

Frank Kokmeyer said...

Thank you doctor your article was very informative.The parents should also have knowledge on the dental products which are available so that they can take care of their kids even better.

Anonymous said...

I first browsed your web and thank you so much for your professional opinions. I have 12 months old with four decayed upper teeth which were checked out a week ago. The dentist suggested that those teeth should be removed. I was very worried about it, as the little one is so young. Is there any alternative for it? Could the crown be an option? It will take about 5-6 years for growing adult teeth. How will it affect the growth of his other teeth with abscess. What will the consequences be in 5-6 years with abscess?

Your opinion is highly appreciated.

T. Tong
Toronto, Canada





Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Well T. As you can read here on the blog, a baby teeth that are so far gone that they abscess, usually need to be removed. Saving a baby front tooth can get quite involved--pulpal treatments, a crown--that is assuming there is enough tooth structure left to hold on to after the decay is removed and any pulp treatment done. General anesthesia is usually needed for very young children for such treatments as well. Cosmetically, you can read here not he blog about fake baby teeth and when they are indicated. Good luck.

Bad tooth decay on a two year old-why fix them?

Kopi Luwak said...

Children should never allowed to have soft drinks, coffee, tea, and other sugary drinks. Those are not good for teeth.

Regards,
Finn Felton

Tram said...

My son is turning 5 in 3 months. He is a little person having a condition called achondroplasia. His pediatric dentist identified a few (black) cavities on the sides of the upper 4 incisors. These cavities are still on the enamel, have not touched the nerves. My son also has small (white)cavities on 1 bottom canine and 1 bottom molar. His pediatric dentist recommends general aneasthesia and refers to have the procedure done in a hospital setting (as my son would not sit still for fillings). Considering the escalated risks of general anaesthesia for achondroplasia with airway obstructions and sleep apnea, we do not want general anaesthesia done on him if it can be avoided. I also consulted with my dentist and she said it can be done without general anaesthesia as surface fillings do not hurt. Parents just have to help keep the kid to lie still. Please let me know your thoughts and options we have. If we go with my dentist's suggestion, will we traumatize him? Last year, there was only 1 cavity between 1 the upper front incisor and the side tooth and now it spreads to the other areas. All are still on the surface. I have been flossing his teeth once a day at night but still can't avoid cavity. Thank you very much. Tram

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

All I can say is, generally, we let the physicians and anesthesiologists evaluate any kids with medical conditions and how to handle anesthesia in the hospital. They do a great job for us. If there are known airway concerns, in office sedation would involve many of the same concerns as far as anesthesia. Yes, we do many small fillings without local anesthesia--each kid is different, but most do very well. If cavities are large, dee, if the child is sensitive, or if you are doing things like removal of teeth, messing around with obviously we use local anesthesia.
Seems your concern is behavior (holding still, fussing, moving). I'll leave it up to your pediatric dentist to decide if any of the work is doable. A little movement is ok, a lot is not. Just remember, cavities do tend to get larger and deeper with time--and so does the amount of work required to fix the problem. Good luck.